Jun 28
2017

Some very sad news today, as the family of Michael Nyqvist has confirmed the actor’s passing at age 56. Mr. Nyqvist landed his breakthrough role at age 39, playing Rolf, an abusive alcoholic husband in the 2000 film “Together.” The Swedish movie about members of a leftist commune in suburban Stockholm in the 1970s led to his first nomination for a Guldbagge, the annual cinema awards in Sweden. From there, Mr. Nyqvist was cast in leading roles on television shows and in films, including as Mikael Blomkvist, the fervent investigative reporter, in the original Swedish adaptation of the book series “The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo.” He also received bigger parts in blockbuster Hollywood movies, playing a deranged Swedish-born Russian nuclear strategist in the 2011 movie “Mission: Impossible — Ghost Protocol.” What better way to celebrate this wonderful actor’s career by re-watching the “Millennium” trilogy anytime soon. Here are some of Noomi’s and Michael’s moments together from the promotional tours of the “Dragon Tattoo” films.


May 12
2017

“Unlocked” has been released in UK theaters last Friday and has entered the box office earning £258,000 over the weekend. The US theatrical release date has been set for September 01, 2017. Below, you will find a compilation of press junket interviews with Noomi, director Michae Apted and co-stars Orlando Bloom and Michael Douglas, as well as three new clips from the film.

May 07
2017

“Unlocked” has premiered in UK theaters on Friday. Reviews have been favorable to mixed, all describing it as a female Bourne-story with praise for Rapace (except for the Hollywood Reporter) and criticism on the plot – but not as bad as one would have feared for a film that has been shelved for over two years. Here’s a selection of reviews from the British press, highlighting Noomi’s performance, production stills can be found below.

Variety, Guy Lodge, May 05, 2017
As the Hollywood casting search for a new, rebooted Lisbeth Salander starts up again, spare a thought for poor Noomi Rapace. Having stepped aside for Rooney Mara in David Fincher’s 2011 film, the original girl with the dragon tattoo is still proving her mettle for the part in far lesser vehicles like “Unlocked” – an anonymously enjoyable espionage thriller that, for purposes of memory, all but self-destructs the second the closing credits begin to roll.

The Guardian, Simran Hans, May 07, 2017
Islamic State, MI5, a deadly virus and a neck-tattooed Orlando Bloom: screenwriter Peter O’Brien throws everything at the wall in this derivative thriller. Nothing sticks. With a cast of A-listers including John Malkovich, Michael Douglas and Toni Collette, not to mention Rapace herself, you’d expect at least one performance capable of cutting through the script’s sludge. Still, worth a hate-watch if only to hear Bloom’s former marine declare in full EastEnders mode: “I love a tagine.”

The Telegraph, Robbie Collin, May 04, 2017
The sheer flimsiness of every role here, including Rapace’s, means it’s rarely possible to see the highly recognisable cast as anyone other than themselves: in particular, the moment Bloom’s character first pulls off his balaclava to reveal the grinning face of Legolas underneath is a ludicrous ‘Only me!’ moment worthy of The Fast Show.

The Guardian, Peter Bradshaw, May 05, 2017
Noomi Rapace plays Alice, a CIA agent undercover in London; Michael Douglas is her handler; John Malkovich is the hawkish spy chief at Langley; and Collette is his testy opposite number at MI5. Alice is curtly called in to interrogate a jihadi intermediary suspected of being about to give the “go” instruction on a bio-warfare attack somewhere in the US. She’s about to break him – when something strange happens. Like so many thrillers of this sort, the movie blandly assumes that Middle Eastern terrorists aren’t smart enough to fool US authorities: it takes American converts and American spies. But this covert cliche aside, Unlocked is an entertaining genre thriller, punched home with vigour and attack.

The Hollywood Reporter, Stephen Dalton, May 03, 2017
Rapace has the kick-ass moves, but her low-voltage performance is too waxy and blank for a lead role. Sporting tattoos and a man-bun, Bloom makes a comically off-target bid to rebrand himself as a Jason Statham-type hard man, barking cod-Dickensian lines in a cartoonish mockney accent that will grate with many Brit viewers. Collette radiates twinkly androgynous mischief with her peroxide punkette buzzcut and cut-glass English accent.

Mar 25
2017

In the past few weeks, I have worked behind the scenes to bring a new, mobile friendly video archive to Noomi Rapace Online. The old one has stopped working a while ago on mobile devices, so I’m happy to finally launch the new archive. All the clips from the old archive are uploaded and lots of new clips have been added as well. From Noomi’s first appearance on the Swedish soap opera Tre Kronor to the December-releasing Netflix thriller Bright, all of her projects are covered with trailers, featurettes – as well as talkshow appearances, awards ceremonies, news appearances and television specials. My thanks to MonicaN for providing the plugin. Enjoy!

Feb 12
2017

The BAFTA Awards are happening as we speak, and the first pictures of Noomi in an unconventional look on the red carpet have been added to the photo gallery. Edit: Hundreds of additional pictures from the arrivals, the show (Noomi presented the big award of the night, Best Film, together with Tom Hiddleston), press room and after-party have been added. Many many thanks to the wonderful Claudia and Lindsey for their contributions. Much appreciated.




Photo Gallery – Public Appearances – 2017 – 30th Annual BAFTA Awards – Arrivals
Photo Gallery – Public Appearances – 2017 – 30th Annual BAFTA Awards – Show
Photo Gallery – Public Appearances – 2017 – 30th Annual BAFTA Awards – Press Room
Photo Gallery – Public Appearances – 2017 – 30th Annual BAFTA Awards – After-Party

Feb 09
2017

The trailer and poster for “Unlocked” has been released today, and it looks very good. That being said, the film has been awaiting theatrical release for over three years, so one was worried what could have gone wrong. London is under biological attack from terrorists in Unlocked, and only Noomi Rapace has the key. Rapace stars as a CIA operative who finds her mission compromised. She’s forced to team up with an MI5 agent, played by Orlando Bloom, to track down the terrorist infiltration and prevent a major attack. Along the way, she’s ably assisted (or hindered?) by the likes of Michael Douglas, Toni Collette, and John Malkovich. Quite a cast. Veteran British director Michael Apted is behind the camera on this one, which makes sense given his Bond pedigree on The World Is Not Enough. Unlocked arrives on 5 May. Screencaptures have been added to the photo gallery, alongside the film’s poster.

Jan 09
2017

Today, “Rupture” releases on DVD and Blu-Ray in the United Kingdom, and later this month in Germany and other European countries. Having received my copy already, it’s been disappointing to see Noomi in a thriller that, on the one hand is keeping its pace, but on the other is airless and without a message (nevermind a sense) at all. Screencaptures from the Blu-Ray have been added to the photo gallery.


Nov 11
2016

Norway-born helmer Tommy Wirkola moves into new territory with the upcoming sci-fi film What Happened to Monday?, starring Noomi Rapace as seven identical twins in a futuristic world where families are limited to one child because of overpopulation. The director, 36, is known for his action-heavy work, including the zombie comedy-horror cult hit Dead Snow and its sequel and Paramount’s 2013 Jeremy Renner-starrer Hansel & Gretel: Witch Hunters. But Monday, which SND Groupe M6 has at AFM, allows Wirkola to dive into a gritty futuristic world, not to mention deal with the challenge of having his lead actress play seven characters. The L.A.-based filmmaker spoke to The Hollywood Reporter about how he juggled septuplets and what he thinks about Netflix:

What were the challenges of directing a film where one actress is playing seven characters?

There were many challenges technically and also with story: How can you do this without it being a gimmick? Shooting it would take very long. We ended up shooting in Romania, where we could get the most for our money, and we had a budget of about $20 million. We shot in 94 days, which is an extremely long shoot. The first two months, almost, it was just Noomi alone playing against herself. We had to hire seven doubles, seven good actors from Europe, so we could rehearse with them and could basically block out all the scenes with them. When we shot it, I had a rule that I’d shoot it like any other scene. I didn’t focus on the fact that it was the same actress playing different roles. I didn’t want the audience pulled out of the film. Of course, the technical side is one side of it, but the other is Noomi’s performance — the nuances and differences that she added to the different characters.

The full interview can be read over at The Hollywood Reporter.

Sep 29
2016

Noomi Rapace is not really going to have an easy time in “Rupture”, as today’s released trailer for the claustrophobic horror film shows. Steven Shainberg, best known for directing the erotic thriller “Secretary”, is writing and directing this one, which sees Rapace play a young mother who finds herself unwittingly abducted into a mysterious laboratory. There, she is drugged and experimented on by seedy-looking captors (played by Peter Stormare and Michael Chiklis). And so the escape is on. Popping along right around Halloween, Rupture arrives in cinemas and on demand from 4 November. The trailer can be watched in the video archive. HD screencaptures from the trailer have been added to the photo gallery.

Aug 18
2016

While “Rupture” is still awaiting a theatrical release date (or an on-demand release), the film currently plays at film festivals throughout the United States. The overall consensus of these latest festival reviews promise a rather odd but well done b-movie, which seems to be still in the editing process. Here’s a compilation of its festival reviews:

Paste Magazine: Rupture is a film that can get easily muddled and complicated when trying to describe the plot. At its core is the transformative nature of fear. Noomi Rapace carries the film as a single mother, Renee, who is kidnapped by an alien enclave who insists they are helping her. According to these creatures, humans are capable of transcending their humanity by being exposed to their greatest fears, which causes them to “rupture” and essentially become post-humans.

The Hollywood Reporter: As a woman forced to be the guinea pig in icky science experiments, Noomi Rapace leads a cast with enough familiar names to attract attention; though this turns out to be more of a one-woman show than a roster boasting Michael Chiklis, Peter Stormare and Lesley Manville would suggest, the action suffices to entertain viewers who can get past a couple of oh-come-on-now plot contrivances. An enjoyable captivity thriller unconcerned with the occasional plot hole.

JoBlo.com: Rapace’s performance is good in spots, unexceptional in others. There are a handful of scenes where she really freaks out and they’re played with hysterical gusto. For some reason, however, Renee never really earned my sympathy, and maybe that’s just because she seemed less than natural in the film’s early scenes, which aren’t exactly authentic. I never bought Renee as a flesh and blood character, and part of that’s Rapace’s performance and part of that is we don’t really know much about her other than the broad strokes the screenplay (by Brian Nelson) gives us.

Screen Anarchy: Rupture is the latest film from writer-director Steven Shainberg (Secretary) and it had its world premiere at Fantasia. Shainberg often works with complex female characters and stories, and Rupture is no different. In the film, Noomi Rapace (The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo trilogy, Prometheus) plays a mother who’s abrubtly abducted one day after dropping her son off at the ex’s house for the weekend. She’s drugged and wakes up in the back of a truck en route to a facility where she’s kept imprisioned for experiements in fear. She discovers that she’s not alone as she tries to escape her captors, who inject icky drugs into her and speak with hardly any emotion in frightening tale reminescent of Invasion of the Body Snatchers.