Oct 30
2010

Time Magazine is full of praise for Noomi, as you can read in the following article, accompanied by an exclusive Q&A video: Lisbeth Salander, the character at the center of Stieg Larsson’s three novels (The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, The Girl Who Played with Fire and The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest) and their Swedish film versions, has ascended to a rare height in crime fiction: she’s become the female Hannibal Lecter.

Continue Reading

Oct 29
2010

Article courtesy The Dallas Morning News, October 29 2010: Noomi Rapace is hurtling through the pop-culture equivalent of a wormhole, warping her way from someone you’ve never heard of into someone you never stop hearing about. As you may have guessed from her name, she’s not from around here. Rapace is an actress from a country best known for producing safe cars and sleek furniture. “Swedish actress” isn’t exactly an express ticket to the stars in Hollywood, but Rapace is riding a rocket thanks to her film-screen incarnation of one of the most powerful and popular characters in contemporary fiction. Rapace plays Lisbeth Salander in the Swedish film adaptation of author Stieg Larsson’s best-selling Millennium Trilogy; more than 20 million copies have sold in more than 40 countries. Rapace’s character is the girl featured in each of the titles, The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo, The Girl Who Played With Fire and the just-released The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest.

Continue Reading

Oct 29
2010

Article courtesy The Wall Street Journal, October 28 2010: When the Swedish-born actress Noomi Rapace took the role of Lisbeth Salander, a.k.a. The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo, in the Swedish film adaptation of Stieg Larsson’s Millennium trilogy, “it felt like some sort of suicide mission,” she said in an interview. “Everybody seems to love Lisbeth, but it’s impossible to satisfy everybody. I had to ignore that and create some kind of protective bubble around me. I went into my own universe.” Ms. Rapace was in New York this week to promote the third and final film in the saga, “The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest,” which will hit theaters on Friday. David Fincher is at work in Stockholm on the American version – starring Daniel Craig as journalist Mikael Blomkvist and Rooney Mara of “The Social Network,” in the role of Ms. Salander – but things are just heating up for Ms. Rapace. She now has a whole Hollywood team working in her interests. She’s filming a role in London opposite Robert Downey Jr. in the sequel to “Sherlock Holmes.” And Music Box Films, the U.S. distributor of the three Swedish “Dragon Tattoo” films, is reportedly rolling out an Oscar campaign for its star.

Continue Reading

Oct 27
2010

Article courtesy The Los Angeles Times, October 26, 2010: In her native Sweden, actress Noomi Rapace has, as she says, lost her freedom. In her native Sweden, actress Noomi Rapace has, as she says, lost her freedom. “Everybody knows me. If I was sitting like this,” she said, glancing around the dimly lighted lobby of the Chateau Marmont during a recent trip to Hollywood, “people would be looking and somebody would come and ask for an autograph and people would probably be listening to us and what we’re saying. I can’t really just go out in Stockholm. I have to have a car waiting. I can’t take the bus. It’s not possible anymore.” That Rapace might soon lose her anonymity in the United States – where her star is rapidly rising after her turn in the movie adaptations of novelist Stieg Larsson’s Millennium Trilogy – is, not surprisingly, a prospect she finds somewhat terrifying. But as the popular Swedish-language franchise’s final film, “The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest,” hits theaters here Friday, the 30-year-old actress is facing an entirely new reality.

Continue Reading

Oct 27
2010

Noomi Rapace told Cinematical that she is playing a gypsy in ‘Sherlock Holmes 2,’ her first Hollywood film. “My character is a gypsy,” Rapace said in an interview Monday in Los Angeles, Calif. “She is a traveler and she’s cool – she’s a bit crazy, but I like her. I’m having a great time. Rapace said that despite the material’s energetic, fun tone, she is doing a lot of research to make sure her character is as authentic as possible.

I’m doing a lot of research about gypsies,” she explained. “I’m going to Paris to visit some gypsy camps, and I’m going to Transylvania to actually see how they live. Because the gypsies are so poor, they live pretty much the same as they did then, and they keep in the traditions and all of that, so when you go to Transylvania, for example, they live pretty close to the way they lived hundreds of years ago. So I’m listening to gypsy music and I’m learning to sing and dance.

The production of Ritchie’s film has largely been shrouded in mystery thus far, protecting its secrets so they can be properly revealed when the film is released on December 16, 2011. But Rapace revealed that the sequel has a similar tone to the first film, and she’s enjoying exploring that kind of creative environment. “It’s really fun,” she said. “I like the guys I’m working with. I think [in ‘Sherlock Holmes 2’], we’re working in that same kind of landscape. They have created some kind of world, and it’s really fun to work with them.”

Oct 23
2010

Article courtesy the San Franscisco Chronicle: On the phone, what jumps out about Sweden’s Noomi Rapace, who indelibly portrayed iron-willed woman of few words Lisbeth Salander in the “Millennium Trilogy” films, is her British-inflected English and rapid-fire, energetic speech. “I think she’s a beautiful example of how you can manage to survive and turn yourself from being a victim, being pissed on and treated so badly, how you can turn it into strength and into power,” she says of the much-beloved character. “She doesn’t feel pity for herself. She doesn’t complain. She always finds a way to act instead of being wrapped up in a lot of emotional issues. She’s a survivor and a fighter, and she’s trying every minute to free herself and not accept the destiny that everybody around her, pretty much, has forced her into. I think that’s pretty beautiful.”

Continue Reading

Oct 12
2010

Article courtesy The New York Times. Remember that mysterious, unpublished, unconfirmed manuscript of the fourth book in Stieg Larsson’s best-selling “Millennium” series? It’s actually the fifth book. So said Mr. Larsson’s brother, Joakim, in an interview on CBS that was broadcast on Sunday. “I got an e-mail from Stieg 10 days before he died, where he said that book four is nearly finished,” Joakim Larsson said in the interview, which also included his father, Erland. “To make it more complicated, this book No. 4 – that’s book No. 5,” he added. “Because he thought that was more fun to write.” The disclosure – should it be true – adds another turn to an already twisty personal story that is nearly as complicated as the plots of the Swedish crime mysteries that Mr. Larsson wrote.

The first three books of the “Millennium” series, beginning with “The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo,” and ending with “The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest,” have become a publishing phenomenon, with tens of millions of copies in print. Mr. Larsson did not live to see the books published; he died of a heart attack in 2004, at the age of 50. The author had said he intended the series to consist of 10 books, and he was working on a manuscript when he died. Under Swedish law, control of his estate went to his family, not to Eva Gabrielsson, his longtime companion. Ms. Gabrielsson, who is reportedly in possession of a laptop containing the manuscript, declined to comment to CBS. Paul Bogaards, a spokesman for Knopf, the American publisher of the “Millennium” books, said he believed the unpublished manuscript existed but did not know whether it was intended to be the fourth book or the fifth. Whether it will ever be published is another question. Depending on the plot and substance of the story, it is possible that it could work as the fourth book in the series, even if it had been intended to be the fifth. According to CBS, the Larssons said they would not allow the book to be published.

Oct 11
2010

Again, with many thanks to Mariana, high quality scans from the Summer 2009 issue of Swedish Film magazine have been added to the gallery. The article is in English, so I’m sure most of you can read it :-)

Oct 10
2010

With many thanks to the great Mariana, scans from Paper Magazine (Spring 2010) and Bon International (Spring/Summer 2010) have been added to the Image Library. Enjoy reading!

Oct 08
2010

The latest issue of Entertainment Weekly, on newsstands October 15, 2010, features a spread on Noomi, entitled “Dragon Tattoo and Beyond”. Be sure to pick your copy – and if anyone is able to contribute scans, please drop me a line :-)