Welcome to Noomi Rapace Online, your premiere web resource on the Swedish actress. Best known for her performances as Lisbeth Salander in the original "The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo" film trilogy, "Prometheus" and the recent Indie hit "Lamb", Noomi Rapace has emerged as one of the most exciting European actresses of this decade. This unofficial fansite provides you with all latest news, photos, editorials and video clips on her past and present work.  Enjoy your stay and check back soon.
Apr
23
2024

Johan Renck, the director of the new hit Netflix sci-fi movie, Spaceman, believes that especially today, you can do whatever the fuck you want and nobody will give a shit. “There are no rules.” Fellow Swede Noomi Rapace, who stars in the new Apple TV sci-fi series, Constellation, echoes a familiar sentiment. So what is the point of art? Typically an antagonism towards the machinaions of culture, the role of art today is especially to make us feel more than it is to make us think. In light of their concurrent releases, office Editor-in-Chief Simon Rasmussen (who has more in common with Noomi and Johan than their Scandinavian heritage) called them up to discuss life, love, isolation, reality, gargantuan spiders, creativity, and the role of traditional storytelling and a slower pace in a present driven by hysterical consumption. In this conversation, there are no rules to break. The complete interview can be read over at Office Magazine.

But all the responses to Spaceman and Constellation – the strong reactions and the love – suggests that these projects hit some kind of sweet spot in people because they question identity and reflect on life without cynicism. It’s interesting because a lot of things are cynical today and still work really well. Yet, there’ are previous generations who have already gone through the circle of cynicism, dealing with mental health issues when it was taboo to say, ‘I’m really fucking unhappy.” I feel like it’s less taboo to say that now. And as you say Simon, there’s this emerging subculture of youth that refuses to be online.

Mar
29
2024

A new batch of articles and interviews from the “Constellation” press coverage has been added to the photo gallery, mostly from the British press and including Q&As with The Guardian and The Observer (many thanks to Alvaro for sending this in). And while we’re at it, I also found a couple of articles from the very sparse coverage for last year’s “Django”. A complete list of updates can be found below.

Related Media

Photo Gallery – Articles & Scans – 2024 – Empire Magazine (United Kingdom, May 2024)
Photo Gallery – Articles & Scans – 2024 – The Guardian (United Kingdom, March 04, 2024)
Photo Gallery – Articles & Scans – 2024 – The Observer (United Kingdom, March 03, 2024)
Photo Gallery – Articles & Scans – 2024 – Closer (USA, February 26, 2024)
Photo Gallery – Articles & Scans – 2024 – Radio Times (United Kingdom, February 24, 2024)
Photo Gallery – Articles & Scans – 2023 – Radio Times (United Kingdom, February 25, 2023)
Photo Gallery – Articles & Scans – 2023 – Radio Times (United Kingdom, January 28, 2023)

Mar
16
2024

Noomi Rapace is the cover girl for DEK Magazine’s eighth issue, which is now available to order on their website: Rapace was already a great admirer of MacLaren’s work on episodes of Breaking Bad, Better Call Saul and Game of Thrones, and Constellation unites the narrative depth of such complex TV with the spectacle of cinema. “It’s sort of like our medium now has just conquered another space: we have more time to tell a story. But I will say that Constellation really feels like eight hours of cinema; we had the muscles to really explore and make it as good as we wanted, so it felt like a big studio film rather than TV.” Combining elements of science fiction and conspiracy thriller, it tells the tale of returning astronaut Jo Ericsson, a part that Rapace immediately felt could have been written for her. It’s the kind of intelligent storytelling that she enjoys as a viewer too.

“There’s so much going on. And I love that because a lot of the things I read, or when I watch things, I just feel, ‘Do you think I’m stupid?’ The audience is not stupid. And I like it when I feel it’s something to figure out.” Her favourite films are those like Memento and Inception, with strong characters and intricate plots that demand multiple viewings, which reflect Rapace’s own perspective on life. “Life is science fiction; life is fucking weird. So many times I thought I knew what life was, and then I was like, ‘Wait, what? No, I don’t know shit.’ I feel the older I get, the more I feel I don’t know. I would say my life many times has felt like I’m living in a movie that is science fiction mixed with drama.”

Related Media

Photo Gallery – Articles & Scans – 2024 – DEK Magazine (United Kingdom, Issue 08, March 16, 2024)
Photo Gallery – Editorial Photography – 2024 – Session 04

Nov
25
2023

For the October 2023 issue of the Swedish Nuda Paper (a biannual hardcover publication), Icelandic poet, novelist, and lyricist Sjón and Noomi Rapace join for a discussion on the complexity of the human species and its most salient features. A wide-ranging interivew accompanied by a fantastic new editorial featuring Noomi. Drawing from memories of their Icelandic childhood and recent experiences with their surroundings, Sjón and Rapace highlight the meaningful influence that an innate connection with nature has had on how they think of life. As they investigate the links between human evolution and climate change, the conversation rapidly turns into a call to action to denounce the abuses inflicted on the most fragile, animals and humans alike. From the necessity to take control of our competitiveness to the disillusionment with today’s materialistic system, the two pinpoint the perks and flaws of what being human entails while stressing the urge to go back to our most genuine essence. The article can be read on the Nuda Paper website, the hardcover can be ordered in their shop.

Related Media

Photo Gallery – Editorial Photography – 2023 – Session 01

Nov
16
2023

With nothing happening in the present, let’s take another deep dive into the past: Several articles and interviews from Icelandic outlets have been added, all covering Noomi’s breakthrough role with the “Millennium” trilogy and her move to Hollywood. Included are some great cover stories and rare pictures from that time. Enjoy the new addtions.

Related Media

Photo Gallery – Articles & Scans – 2011 – SunnudagsMogginn (Iceland, December 25, 2011)
Photo Gallery – Articles & Scans – 2010 – Morgunbladid (Iceland, August 21, 2010)
Photo Gallery – Articles & Scans – 2010 – Sky (Iceland, January 14, 2010)
Photo Gallery – Articles & Scans – 2009 – SunnudagsMogginn (Iceland, November 15, 2009)
Photo Gallery – Articles & Scans – 2009 – Dagbladid Vísir (Iceland, July 24, 2009)
Photo Gallery – Articles & Scans – 2009 – Fréttabladid (Iceland, July 23, 2009)
Photo Gallery – Articles & Scans – 2009 – Morgunbladid (Iceland, July 23, 2009)

May
20
2023

With not much happening right now (except for a new clip from “Assassin Club”, which unfortunately doesn’t serve as front page news), I spent some time revamping the press library. You can now easily browse articles by year or fast forward to some in-depth cover stories. Have a look at a selection of great covers below.

Related Media

Press Library – Main Page and Cover Stories

Nov
03
2022

Goran Stolevski’s debut feature You Won’t Be Alone is Australia’s official submission for the Academy Award for Best International Feature Film. Produced by Causeway Films’ Kristina Ceyton and Samantha Jennings, the supernatural horror, set in 19th century Macedonia, stars Noomi Rapace, Anamaria Marinca, Alice Englert, Carloto Cotta, Félix Maritaud and Sara Klimoska. It first premiered at Sundance in the World Cinema Dramatic Competition, going on to receive rave reviews, with critics drawing comparisons between Stolevski and filmmakers such as Terrence Malick and Jonathan Glazer. The film also screened in competition at Sydney Film Festival, won best film at the Bucheon International Fantastic Film Festival and Best Film of the Official Fantástic Competition Selection at Sitges. Variety named Stolevski one of its 10 directors to watch of 2022.

To have been selected for submission to one of the highest accolades there is in our industry and be representing Australia is just wonderful/slightly surreal. It’s of course immensely competitive with another 91 very brilliant films from around the world up for nomination, but it’s great to be in the running and, even at this early stage, to be shining a light on the calibre of our talent and how diverse Australia’s screen stories are. (Kristina Ceyton, Inside Film)

This is the second consecutive time that a film starring Noomi Rapace is submitted for the Best International Film for an Academy Award after Iceland’s submission of “Lamb” last year.

Nov
03
2022

The 2022 Nordic Council Film Prize has been awarded to Iceland’s “Lamb”, directed Valdimar Jóhannsson, who co-wrote with Sjón; and produced by Hrönn Kristinsdóttir and Sara Nassim. The award was presented on Tuesday evening (November 2) during the Nordic Council’s autumn session in Helsinki. The lucrative Nordic Council Film Prize comes with a cash award of $39,800 (DKK 300,000), which is shared between the director, writers, and producers in honour of the collaborative nature of filmmaking. Lamb, which premiered in Cannes Un Certain Regard in 2021 and won the ‘prize of originality’, is a supernatural drama about an Icelandic couple (played by Noomi Rapace and Hilmir Snaer Gudnason) who find a mysterious newborn on their farm. The other nominees this year – one each from the Nordic countries – were Godland by Hlynur Pálmason submitted by Denmark, The Blind Man Who Did Not Want To See Titanic by Teemu Nikki for Finland, The Worst Person In The World by Joachim Trier from Norway and Clara Sola by Nathalie Alvarez Mesen from Sweden.

May
26
2022

WWD has posted a nice article and interview with Noomi: If there’s a Palme d’Or awarded for having fun, it should go to Noomi Rapace. Because she is clearly having the best time at this Cannes festival, taking in every dinner and late-night party, not to mention seeing 21 films in 12 days. The actress is making the most of her experience as a member of the main competition jury. In her hotel suite dressed in a sculptured Celine gown and diamonds from Chopard, Rapace is sprawled across her bed surrounded by racks of dresses, shoes and jewelry. Every night she’s been going to sleep “as excited as a kid.” Her energy is infectious. “I just feel so amazed, surprised and inspired by all the people around me and all the films,” she tells WWD, careful not to give away any indication of which ones are her favorites so far. That info is kept carefully under wraps until the final selection is revealed Saturday. The complete interview can be read here.

We talk about what is good and what is bad, I find that doesn’t really matter, it needs to do something to you. What is ‘good’ and what is ‘bad’? I love films that stay with me and burn some mark in me,” she says about debating with her fellow panelists. It’s very much about instinct, a bit like falling in love and feeling something. I don’t want to be too analytical and too political and to overthink stuff. If I’m brutally honest, I always know. Then I can dance around and be more diplomatic and I really try to stay open as well for what the other jury members might add or what perspectives they might have on things. I’m also learning from that. It kind of feels like going to school.

Dec
09
2021

Another fantastic interview with Noomi’s in yesterday’s i Newspaper: For a few years when she was growing up in Iceland, Noomi Rapace lived on a farm, but she was too young to get involved with any of the day-to-day labour. So when, on her first day on the set of her new film, Lamb, she had to drive a tractor and deliver a lamb, it was something of a baptism of fire. “I knew I could not f**k up,” she tells me over coffee in a London hotel. “But I didn’t have a lot of adrenaline. There was a strange calmness.” Still, her foray into midwifery left its mark. “The weirdest thing was the very specific smell. It just wouldn’t wash off. It stayed for a week or something.” The Icelandic film, directed by first-timer Valdimar Jóhannsson, was the break-out hit at this year’s Cannes Film Festival. Rapace, 41, plays a woman caught between two brothers, who loosely resemble Cain and Abel: she’s married to one and had previously been involved with the other. It is not the only biblical element to the tale; her character is called Maria, after all. When the childless couple discover a newborn in their barn, they are so excited that they fail to notice there is something odd about it – namely that it is half-lamb, half-human. The complete interview can be read over at i News – here’s Noomi’s quote on the recently wrapped “Django”, which will span over ten episodes:

I wanted to take a break. I had a Skype call with the director and writers who wanted to create a role. Then Nicholas Pinnock texted me for a coffee and I took him to work out with me in a climbing class. As we were leaving, he tells another friend: ‘I’m off to Romania tomorrow and Noomi’s going to play my sister’. And I thought: ‘I haven’t said yes yet’. The character is the most beautiful, brutal villain. I dream about her. I told the writers this, and some of my dreams have become part of the script. I have accepted imperfections and allowed myself to feel sadness, vulnerability and weakness. That’s not weakness. I was raised in a way never to cry, never show weakness. So I became very tough. I don’t want to live like that. I don’t want to accept that way of living, and carrying myself, to bleed into my son’s life. I want him to be a human that has access to all emotions, where everything is allowed.