January 13th, 2018       Posted by Frederik       Display Comments

Happy New Year everybody! I completely missed that Noomi has attended the Astrid Andersen runway at London Fashion Week’s Men last week. Many thanks to Marinka for bringing it to my attention. Also, there’s a new interview with Noomi in the Indian edition of The Telegraph and a review page on “Bright” in the February issue of Empire Magazine.

  December 16th, 2017       Posted by Frederik       Display Comments

Article and pictures courtesy Vogue and Astrid Andersen: When an interview ends with you strapped into Noomi Rapace’s new top-of-the-line Audi as she bounces behind the wheel to top-volume Cardi B, then accelerates up Ladbroke Grove faster than anything out of North Korea, well, it’s been an awesome assignment. And when Vogue was invited to lunch with the Swedish-born actress (the original Lisbeth Salander!) and the Danish-born designer Astrid Andersen, that’s exactly how things ended up. But before we hit the road—Andersen and Rapace up front, singing and whooping as we went full throttle, me in the back, trying not to toss my salad—there was much to discuss. Royal College of Art–trained Andersen founded her menswear label in 2010, and last year started showing womenswear, too. She and Rapace didn’t meet all that long ago, but have since become firm friends. So for Spring 2018, Rapace volunteered to model Andersen’s collection (the women’s, with a sprinkling of men’s) in a shoot masterminded at the actress’s London house. That seemed like a perfect reason to meet, eat, and listen in on these two besties discussing friendship, clothes, first boyfriends, and plenty more besides. What follows is an edited record of a conversation in which, just like that hair-raising drive afterward, Vogue was very much in the back seat.

If you do something that you’re forced into, or you’re eye candy for someone, or you dress for someone else and you don’t feel comfortable, well, you don’t feel empowered and you don’t feel free. If you can’t dance in it, you can’t move in it, you can’t feel your energy and your charisma flowing, that is wrong. But if you wear something that you can move in and that makes you grow, you can come into any room and be like: Boom, here I am! You know, I never thought I would be comfortable in some places. I come from a farm and I come from no money. I didn’t even speak English seven and a half years ago. So I have to go on my intuition all the time. And I think that Astrid is very much the same; you have to go on your gut feeling.

  November 24th, 2017       Posted by Frederik       Display Comments

There’s no shortage of upcoming magazine appearances, lucky us, which includes two fantastic new editorials for Flaunt Magazine (December issue) and Styleby Magazine (Sweden, Winter 2017/2018 issue). Outtakes from both photoshoots have been added to the photo gallery.

Photo Gallery – Editorial Photography – 2017 – Session 16
Photo Gallery – Editorial Photography – 2017 – Session 17

  October 15th, 2017       Posted by Frederik       Display Comments

10 Magazine has posted its interview with Noomi Rapace on their website, so make sure to head over and read it: I meet her at the South Kensington Club, where she is a member, mostly to use the gym upstairs. If you put her name into Google Images, two of the top five suggested searches are “Noomi Rapace abs” and “Noomi Rapace muscles”. She practises Thai kickboxing and trains with her boyfriend. Today, her hair is peroxide blonde. Rapace’s presence commands attention. People in the club know who she is – a few say hello – but if they didn’t, there’s something in her demeanour that makes you aware she is there. Rapace says that people in London don’t recognise her, but I imagine they know she is someone, they just might not know who. Her face is angular but still feminine, which allows her to slide between the androgynous and the sexual – a shift that many directors demand of her. So you may be forgiven that she would be guarded – a reluctant interviewee, lost in preparations for whatever comes next. But she’s not. “People think I’m very serious and I’m very dark because of the roles I play – I’m not,” she says. It’s a statement delivered with – as many things she says are – a husky giggle. She tells me her favourite word is boom. “I say it alllllll the time,” she says. So much so that the word is written out in diamonds on a ring on her finger and also hangs from an earring. Both are custom made. She got the same earring made for her close friend Marilyn Manson. His is in silver.

  August 14th, 2017       Posted by Frederik       Display Comments

The third interview comes from am New York, including her view on the constant shift between theatrical releases and direct on-demand releases (as seen with “What Happened to Monday?” and the upcoming “Bright”): In the dystopian Netflix film “What Happened to Monday,” out Aug. 18, Swedish actress Noomi Rapace has the arduous task of playing seven sisters. The siblings, all named after days of the week, have to assume the identity of one person in order to survive in a society plagued by overpopulation. Things spiral out of control when one sister goes rogue. Rapace spoke with amNewYork about the challenges of playing seven different characters.

What do you make of the industry’s shift toward streaming platforms?
It’s changing and it’s happening. We can’t really fight it. If you look at the music industry, a lot of my friends are musicians and it hit them before it hit us. I embrace change. It’s quite amazing that people from all over the world will be able to see my film at the same time. Though some movies deserve a big screen and to be theatrically released. We need to work and find a balance between that but we have to make the best out of it. It’s all for the love of film.

Once again, the complete interview with Noomi Rapace can be read here.

  August 14th, 2017       Posted by Frederik       Display Comments

Today’s second interview that deserves a special mention comes from the Columbus Dispatcher. Already popular in her native Sweden, Noomi Rapace rose to international fame in 2009 via her intense performances as Lisbeth Salander in the Swedish film adaptations of Stieg Larsson’s ″The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo.″ That same year, she went on to star in ″The Girl Who Played With Fire″ and “The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest.” She lost out to Rooney Mara when the American version of “The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo″ was made in 2011, acknowledding then that she was nervous about the prospect of going to Hollywood. She wasn’t even sure that she wanted to work in the United States, she said. Six years later, Rapace seems far less nervous. She has a string of American films to her credit, including hits such as Guy Ritchie’s ″Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows″ (2011) and Ridley Scott’s ″Prometheus″ (2012) as well as the indie productions ″The Drop″ (2015), ″Child 44″⁣ (2015) and ″⁣Rupture″⁣ (2016). She lives in England now and works frequently.

It’s gone really well. I realize that it’s not that different from what I was doing in Sweden. I think my idea of Hollywood was that I was not going to be working with real filmmakers, with proper artists, and I’ve realized that it’s actually all a mix. On the biggest productions in Hollywood today, there are big, artistic, stately, artsy directors. I thought it was going to be very different from what I was used to and how I was used to working, but it feels like the film industry in Hollywood – and in other countries I’ve worked in, too – is closer to what I wanted to do than I first expected.

Back then, the multilingual Rapace still struggled with English. During an interview on behalf of ″Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows,″ she continually apologized and asked, ″Is this the right word?″ Her English nowadays is essentially flawless. ″I almost forgot about that because I moved to London and I’ve been in London maybe for four years now,″ Rapace said. ″My family lives with me here, and we speak English at home. So it’s like, my sister’s boyfriend, my sister, me and my son — we all speak English.” The complete interview can be read here.

  August 13th, 2017       Posted by Frederik       Display Comments

Articles and interviews to promote the August 18 release of “What Happened to Monday?” are coming in. In the first, Noomi Rapace talks to Looper: Shooting took nearly five months, with Rapace called to set almost every day. Most of the time, she was acting by herself, using a green screen with tennis balls or crosses and listening to her own pre-recorded dialogue in an earpiece. Sometimes, they used doubles, with Rapace showing them exactly how she had acted out the scene when she had been the other character. “Let’s say I’m doing a scene with Saturday and I’m Monday, and then I have to kind of plan what I’m gonna do as Saturday before I’ve done it and then I have to show the double girl how to move, and how to sit, and what line she will reach for the glass, because if we already established it with her I need to fix it later on when I was playing Saturday,” she explained. Still, despite the tough shoot, Rapace says she was proud of the project. “I love a challenge, and this was the hardest thing I could ever imagine,” she said, adding that she could feel a connection with her characters because they were all, like many of her past roles, “women fighting in a man’s world.” The complete article can be read here.

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